6 - 12 Core (Online Private K-12 School)

ADVANTAGES Digital Learning Solutions is at the forefront of innovation, leveraging an Online Private K-12 School with the industry’s only fully integrated management system that allows K-12 and adult education institutions to offer and deliver multiple accredited programs in a variety of blended learning modalities at a fraction of the cost of the traditionally implemented programs. ADVANTAGES provides K-12 educational institutions with a comprehensive collection of online courses that are seamlessly accessible through the cloud-based ASSIST Platform.

English

English 6 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build students' communication and reading comprehension skills. Reading comprehension lessons strengthen students' critical analysis skills as they study how nonfiction and literature can be used to share ideas. Writing lessons combine free-response exercises with drafting strategies and exemplars to help students communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. To develop skills specific to public discourse, speaking and listening lessons guide students as they evaluate clips and readings from speeches and discussions. In language lessons, students build foundational grammar skills they need to articulate their ideas and understand challenging words.

English 7 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build students' communication and reading comprehension skills. Reading comprehension lessons strengthen students' critical analysis skills as they study how nonfiction and literature can be used to share ideas. Writing lessons combine free-response exercises with drafting strategies and exemplars to help students communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. To develop skills specific to public discourse, speaking and listening lessons guide students as they evaluate clips and readings from speeches and discussions. In language lessons, students build foundational grammar skills they need to articulate their ideas and understand challenging words.

English 8 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build students' communication and reading comprehension skills. Reading comprehension lessons strengthen students' critical analysis skills as they study how nonfiction and literature can be used to share ideas. Writing lessons combine free-response exercises with drafting strategies and exemplars to help students communicate clearly and credibly in narrative, argumentative, and explanatory styles. To develop skills specific to public discourse, speaking and listening lessons guide students as they evaluate clips and readings from speeches and discussions. In language lessons, students build foundational grammar skills they need to articulate their ideas and understand challenging words.

The English 9 course is an overview of exemplar selections of literature in fiction and nonfiction genres. Students read short stories, poems, a full-length novel, and a full-length Shakespeare play, analyzing the use of elements of literature in developing character, plot, and theme. For example, in selected stories, students compare the effect of setting on tone and character development. Likewise, in the poetry unit, students analyze how artists and writers draw from and interpret source material.

The focus of the English 10 course is the writing process. Three writing applications guide the curriculum: persuasive, expository, and narrative writing. Each lesson culminates in a written assignment that lets students demonstrate their developing skill in one of these applications.

In the English 11 course, students examine the belief systems, events, and literature that have shaped the United States. They begin by studying the language of independence and the system of government developed by Thomas Jefferson and other enlightened thinkers. Next, they explore how the Romantics and Transcendentalists emphasized the power and responsibility of the individual in both supporting and questioning the government. Students consider whether the American Dream is still achievable and examine the Modernists’ disillusionment with the idea that America is a “land of opportunity.”

The English 12 course asks students to closely analyze world literature and consider how we humans define and interact with the unknown, the monstrous, and the heroic. In the epic poems The Odyssey, Beowulf, and The Inferno, in Shakespeare’s Tempest, in the satire of Swift, and in the rhetoric of World War II, students examine how the ideas of “heroic” and “monstrous” have been defined across cultures and time periods and how the treatment of the “other” can make monsters or heroes of us all.

English Foundations I supports adolescent literacy development at the critical stage between decoding and making meaning from text. Through intensive reading and writing skills instruction, deep practice sets, consistent formative feedback, graduated reading levels, and helpful strategy tips, the course leads students to improved comprehension and text handling.

English Foundations II offers a year of skill building and strategy development in reading and writing. Semester one is a reading program designed to help struggling readers develop mastery in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, and media literacy. Semester two is a writing program which builds confidence in composition fundamentals by focusing on the areas of composing, grammar, style, and media literacy. Both semesters are structured around ten mini-units which offer interactive instruction and guided practice in each of the four learning strands. Students read for a variety of purposes and write for a variety of audiences. The workshops stress high interest, engaging use of technology, relevant topics, and robustly scaffolded practice. Students learn to use different types of graphic organizers as they develop and internalize reading and writing process strategies. They build confidence as they develop skills and experience success on numerous low stakes assessments that encourage growth and reinforce learning.

Social Sciences

Economics offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that provides an introduction to key economic principles. The course covers fundamental properties of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflations, and the national debt; and a survey of the global economy.

Economics and Personal Finance develops students' economic reasoning through an analysis of the U.S. economy, the global economy, and personal finance. The course covers fundamental principles of economics, including an examination of markets from both historical and current perspectives; the basics of supply and demand; the theories of early economic philosophers such as Adam Smith and David Ricardo; theories of value; the concept of money and how it evolved; the role of banks, investment houses, and the Federal Reserve; Keynesian economics; the productivity, wages, investment, and growth involved in capitalism; unemployment, inflation, and the national debt; and a survey of markets in areas such as China, Europe, and the Middle East. The course extends students' understanding of these principles in the context of personal finance, exploring issues such as career planning, budgeting, credit, taxes, investing, insurance, loans, and major purchases.

Ethnic Studies is a one-semester history and sociology course that examines the multicultural fabric of the United States. The course emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture and ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences.

Geography and World Cultures offers a tightly focused and scaffolded curriculum that enables students to explore how geographic features, human relationships, political and social structures, economics, science and technology, and the arts have developed and influenced life in countries around the world. Along the way, students are given rigorous instruction on how to read maps, charts, and graphs, and how to create them.

In Modern World History from 1450, students study the major turning points that shaped the modern world including the expansion of Islamic and Asian empires, transoceanic exploration, the Atlantic slave trade, the Enlightenment, industrialization, imperialism, nationalism, political revolutions, the world wars, the Cold War, decolonization, and globalization. By presenting content from multiple perspectives and through diverse primary and secondary source materials, this course not only provides students with a solid foundation in the history of the modern era, but it also prepares students to be active and informed citizens of the world. 

In Modern World History from 1600, students study the major turning points that shaped the modern world including the Enlightenment, industrialization, imperialism, nationalism, political revolutions, the world wars, the Cold War, decolonization, and globalization. By presenting content from multiple perspectives and through diverse primary and secondary source materials, this course provides students with a solid foundation in the history of the modern era and prepares students to be active and informed citizens of the world.  

Middle School Civics delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build middle school students' understanding of the political and governmental systems of the United States and the roles played by citizens. By honing their ability to analyze civic life, political practices, and government structures, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.

Middle School Contemporary World delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build middle school students' knowledge of contemporary world geography, cultures, civics, and economics. By honing their ability to analyze the physical, social, and political forces that shape our world, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.

Middle School U.S. History delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build middle school students' knowledge of U.S. history, from the peopling of North America through the era of Reconstruction. Students engage with the subject matter in an interactive, feedback-rich environment as they progress through standards-aligned content. By constantly honing their ability to analyze history, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.

Middle School World History delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to build middle school students' knowledge of world history, from the Neolithic Revolution through the Middle Ages. By constantly honing their ability to analyze history, students build the depth of knowledge and higher-order thinking skills required to demonstrate their mastery when put to the test.

Multicultural Studies is a one-semester elective history and sociology course that examines the United States as a multicultural nation. The course emphasizes the perspectives of minority groups while allowing students from all backgrounds to better understand and appreciate how race, culture and ethnicity, and identity contribute to their experiences.

Psychology provides a solid overview of the field's major domains: methods, biopsychology, cognitive and developmental psychology, and variations in individual and group behavior.

In U.S. Government and Politics, students examine the history, principles, and function of the political system established by the U.S. Constitution. Starting with a basic introduction to the role of government in society and the philosophies at the heart of American democracy, this course provides students with the knowledge needed to be informed and empowered participants in the U.S. political system.  

U.S. History traces the nation's history from the pre-colonial period to the present. Students learn about the Native American, European, and African people who lived in America before it became the United States. They examine the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system. Students investigate the economic, cultural, and social motives for the nation's expansion, as well as the conflicting notions of liberty that eventually resulted in civil war. The course describes the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation and then focuses on its role in modern world affairs.

This course traces the nation's history from the end of the Civil War to the present. It describes the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation, highlighting social policy as well as its role in modern world affairs.

This course traces the nation's history from the pre-colonial period to the end of the American Civil War. It emphasizes the colonial period and the creation of a new nation and examines the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system.

United States History and Geography begins with the establishment of European colonies in North America and then traces the nation's history from post-Civil War to the present. Students examine the beliefs and philosophies that informed the American Revolution and the subsequent formation of the government and political system, then evaluate the attempts to bind the nation together during Reconstruction while simultaneously exploring the growth of an industrial economy. Moving into the 20th and 21st centuries, students probe the economic and diplomatic interactions between the United States and other world players while investigating how the world wars, the Cold War, and the "information revolution" affected the lives of ordinary Americans. Woven through this chronological sequence is a strong focus on the changing conditions of women, African Americans, and other minority groups.

In World History, students learn to see the world today as a product of a process that began thousands of years ago when humans became a speaking, travelling, and trading species.  Through historical analysis grounded in primary sources, case studies, and research, students investigate the continuity and change of human culture, governments, economic systems, and social structures. 

World History to the Renaissance traces the development of civilizations around the world from prehistory to the Renaissance.

In World History, Culture and Geography, students study the major turning points that shaped the modern world including the Enlightenment, industrialization, imperialism, nationalism, political revolutions, the world wars, the Cold War, decolonization, and globalization. By presenting content from multiple perspectives and through diverse primary and secondary source materials, this course provides students with a solid foundation in the history of the modern era and prepares students to be active and informed citizens of the world.  

Physical Education / Health

Health Education is a valuable, skills-based health education course designed for general education in grades 9 through 12. Health Education helps students develop knowledge, attitudes, and essential skills in a variety of health-related subjects, including mental and emotional health, social health, nutrition, physical fitness, substance use and abuse, disease prevention and treatment, and injury prevention and safety.

Health Opportunities through Physical Education (HOPE) combines instruction in health and physical education in a full-year, integrated course. It focuses on developing skills, habits and attitudes to maintain a healthy lifestyle and applying lessons learned to physical fitness. Through active participation and real-world simulations, the course aims to demonstrate firsthand the value of conscientious lifestyle management

Physical Education combines the best of online instruction with actual student participation in weekly cardiovascular, aerobic, and muscle toning activities. The course promotes a keen understanding of the value of physical fitness and aims to motivate students to participate in physical activities throughout their lives.

Electives

In College and Career Preparation I, students obtain a deeper understanding of what it means to be ready for college. Students are informed about the importance of high school performance in college admissions and how to prepare for college testing. They know the types of schools and degrees they may choose to pursue after high school and gain wide exposure to the financial resources available that make college attainable

College and Career Preparation II builds on the lessons and skills in College and Career Preparation I. The course provides a step-by-step guide to choosing a college. It walks students through the process of filling out an application, including opportunities to practice, and takes an in-depth look at the various college-admission tests and assessments, as well financial aid options.

Computer Applications provides an introduction to software applications that prepares students to succeed in the workplace and beyond. Students will develop an understanding of professional communications and leadership skills while gaining proficiency with word processing, email, and presentation management software. Students will also be able to demonstrate digital literacy through basic study web publishing and design, spreadsheets and database software.

Creative Writing is an English elective course that focuses on the exploration of short fiction and poetry, culminating in a written portfolio that includes one revised short story and three to five polished poems. Students draft, revise, and polish fiction and poetry through writing exercises, developing familiarity with literary terms and facility with the writing process as they study elements of creative writing.

Media Literacy teaches students how to build the critical thinking, writing, and reading skills required in a media-rich and increasingly techno-centric world. In a world saturated with media messages, digital environments, and social networking, concepts of literacy must expand to include all forms of media. Today's students need to be able to read, comprehend, analyze, and respond to non-traditional media with the same skill level they engage with traditional print sources.

Reading is a course is designed to help the struggling reader develop mastery in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, and media literacy, which are the course's primary content strands. Using these strands, the course guides the student through the skills necessary to be successful in the academic world and beyond. The reading comprehension strand focuses on introducing the student to the varied purposes of reading (e.g., for entertainment, for information, to complete a task, or to analyze). In the vocabulary strand, the student learns specific strategies for understanding and remembering new vocabulary. In the study skills strand, the student learns effective study and test-taking strategies. In the media literacy strand, the student learns to recognize and evaluate persuasive techniques, purposes, design choices, and effects of media. The course encourages personal enjoyment in reading with 10 interviews featuring the book choices and reading adventures of students and members of the community.

Reading Skills and Strategies is a course is designed to help the struggling reader develop mastery in the areas of reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, and media literacy, which are the course's primary content strands. Using these strands, the course guides the student through the skills necessary to be successful in the academic world and beyond. The reading comprehension strand focuses on introducing the student to the varied purposes of reading (e.g., for entertainment, for information, to complete a task, or to analyze). In the vocabulary strand, the student learns specific strategies for understanding and remembering new vocabulary. In the study skills strand, the student learns effective study and test-taking strategies. In the media literacy strand, the student learns to recognize and evaluate persuasive techniques, purposes, design choices, and effects of media. The course encourages personal enjoyment in reading with 10 interviews featuring the book choices and reading adventures of students and members of the community.

Writing Skills and Strategies develops key language arts skills necessary for high school graduation and success on high stakes exams through a semester of interactive instruction and guided practice in composition fundamentals. The course is divided into ten mini-units of study. The first two are designed to build early success and confidence, orienting students to the writing process and to sentence and paragraph essentials through a series of low-stress, high-interest hook activities. In subsequent units, students review, practice, compose and submit one piece of writing. Four key learning strands are integrated throughout: composition practice, grammar skill building, diction and style awareness, and media and technology exploration. Guided studies emphasize the structure of essential forms of writing encountered in school, in life, and in the work place. Practice in these forms is scaffolded to accommodate learners at different skill levels.

In Expository Writing, students delve into the power and potential of the English language. Reading and writing assignments explore relevant and universal themes including war, human rights, cultural awareness, and humans' relationships with the environment, the media, and technology. By reading and evaluating seminal speeches, essays, and stories, students learn how writing is used to explain, persuade, and entertain. Students develop and practice expressing their own ideas in four types of essays: compare and contrast, persuasive, evaluative, and explanatory. Additional assignments will focus on narrative writing, research projects, and speeches.

Math

Algebra I builds students' command of linear, quadratic, and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Algebra I-A and I-B provide an expanded, two-year course sequence designed for students who are not prepared for the academic challenges of the traditional one-year Algebra I curriculum. Focusing on review of pre-algebra skills and introductory algebra content, Algebra I-A allows students to deepen their understanding of real numbers in their various forms and then extend their knowledge to linear equations in one and two variables.

Algebra I-A and I-B provide an expanded, two-year course sequence designed for students who are not prepared for the academic challenges of the traditional one-year Algebra I curriculum. Algebra I-B course topics include a review of introductory algebra; measurement; graphing data; linear equations; systems of linear equations; polynomials; factoring of polynomials; factoring of quadratic functions; rational expressions; and radical expressions.

Algebra II introduces students to advanced functions, with a focus on developing a strong conceptual grasp of the expressions that define those functions. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Bridge Math is a fourth year math course focused on reinforcing core concepts from Algebra I, Geometry and Algebra II. Bridge Math is intended for students who need to review concepts before continuing their studies. It starts with a review of algebraic concepts before moving on to a variety of key algebraic, geometric, statistical, and probability concepts. Course topics include rational and irrational numbers, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, exponential functions, triangles, coordinate geometry, solid geometry, conditional probability, independence, data analysis, scatterplots, and linear and non-linear models of data.

Consumer Math helps students recognize and develop vital skills that connect life and career goals with personalized strategies and milestone-based action plans. Students explore concepts and work toward a mastery of personal finance skills, deepening their understanding of key ideas and extending their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.

Financial Algebra focuses on real-world financial literacy, personal finance, and business subjects. Students apply what they learned in Algebra 1 and Geometry to topics including personal income, taxes, checking and savings accounts, credit, loans and payments, car leasing and purchasing, home mortgages, stocks, insurance, and retirement planning.

Financial Literacy helps students recognize and develop vital skills that connect life and career goals with personalized strategies and milestone-based action plans. Students explore concepts and work toward a mastery of personal finance skills, deepening their understanding of key ideas and extending their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.

Fundamental Math explores foundational concepts in math. Students master basic skills and extend their knowledge as they prepare for more advanced work. Topics include basic number concepts such as whole numbers, counting, place value, rounding, exponents, and negative numbers; addition and subtraction; and multiplication and division. The course also covers fractions, operations with fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, problem solving, basic concepts in geometry, and measuring shapes.

General Math offers a structured remediation solution based on the NCTM Curricular Focal Points and is designed to expedite student progress in acquiring 3rd- to 5th-grade skills. The course is appropriate for use as remediation for students in grades 6 to 12. When used in combination, Math Foundations I and Math Foundations II (covering grades 6 to 8) effectively remediate computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school–level math courses with confidence.

Geometry builds upon students' command of geometric relationships and formulating mathematical arguments. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Introductory Algebra provides a curriculum focused on foundational concepts that prepare students for success in Algebra I. Through a "Discovery-Confirmation-Practice"-based exploration of basic concepts, students are challenged to work toward a mastery of computational skills, to deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and to extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.

Liberal Arts Mathematics 1 addresses the need for an elective course that focuses on reinforcing, deepening, and extending a student's mathematical understanding. Liberal Arts Mathematics 1 starts with a review of problem-solving skills before moving on to a variety of key algebraic, geometric, and statistical concepts. Throughout the course, students hone their computational skills and extend their knowledge through problem solving and real-world applications.

Liberal Arts Mathematics 2 addresses the need for a course that meets graduation requirements and focuses on reinforcing, deepening, and extending a student's mathematical understanding. Liberal Arts Mathematics 2 starts with a review of algebraic concepts before moving on to a variety of key algebraic, geometric, statistical and probability concepts. Throughout the course, students hone their computational skills and extend their knowledge through problem solving and real-world applications.

Math 6 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practices. Course topics include ratios and rates, fraction and decimal operations, and signed numbers. Students continue to build their algebra skills by plotting points in all four quadrants of the coordinate plane and solving equations and inequalities. Geometry topics include area, surface area, and volume, and statistical work features measures of center and variability, box plots, dot plots, and histograms.

Math 7 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practices. Throughout the course, students gain a deep understanding of proportions and their use in solving problems. They extend their fluency with operations on rational numbers and translate among different forms of rational numbers. Algebra topics include simplifying and rewriting algebraic expressions and solving more complex equations and inequalities. Students also sketch geometric figures and explore scale drawings, investigate circle properties and angle relationships, and deepen their understanding of area, volume, and surface area. They see how statistics uses sample data to make predictions about populations and compare data from different data sets. Students gain a fundamental understanding of probability and explore different ways to find or estimate probabilities.

Math 8 delivers instruction, practice, and review designed to develop computational fluency, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply mathematical practices. In this course, students focus on understanding functions — what they are, how to represent them in different ways, and how to write them to model mathematical and real-world situations. In particular, students investigate linear functions by learning about slope and slope-intercept form. Students' understanding of linear functions is extended to statistics, where they make scatter plots and use linear functions to model data. They solve linear equations and equations involving roots, and explore systems of linear equations. Additional topics include exponents, powers of ten, scientific notation, and irrational numbers. Students learn about transformations, and extend that understanding to an investigation of congruence and similarity. Other geometric concepts explored include the Pythagorean theorem, angle relationships, and volumes of cylinders, cones, and spheres.

Math Foundations I offers a structured remediation solution based on the NCTM Curricular Focal Points and is designed to expedite student progress in acquiring 3rd- to 5th-grade skills. The course is appropriate for use as remediation for students in grades 6 to 12. When used in combination, Math Foundations I and Math Foundations II (covering grades 6 to 8) effectively remediate computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school–level math courses with confidence.

Based on the NCTM Curricular Focal Points, Math Foundations II is designed to expedite student progress in acquiring 6th- to 8th-grade skills. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as middle school curriculum. The program simultaneously builds the computational skills and conceptual understanding needed to undertake high school-level math courses with confidence.

Mathematics I builds students' command of geometric knowledge and linear and exponential relationships. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Mathematics II extends students' geometric knowledge and introduces them to quadratic expressions, equations, and functions, exploring the relationship between these and their linear and exponential counterparts. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Mathematics III incorporates advanced functions, trigonometry, and probability and statistics as students synthesize their prior knowledge and solve increasingly challenging problems. Students learn through discovery and application, developing the skills they need to break down complex challenges and demonstrate their knowledge in new situations.

Mathematics of Personal Finance focuses on real-world financial literacy, personal finance, and business subjects. Students apply what they learned in Algebra I and Geometry to topics including personal income, taxes, checking and savings accounts, credit, loans and payments, car leasing and purchasing, home mortgages, stocks, insurance, and retirement planning.

Precalculus is a course that combines reviews of algebra, geometry, and functions into a preparatory course for calculus. The course focuses on the mastery of critical skills and exposure to new skills necessary for success in subsequent math courses. The first semester includes linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, radical, polynomial, and rational functions; systems of equations; and conic sections. The second semester covers trigonometric ratios and functions; inverse trigonometric functions; applications of trigonometry, including vectors and laws of cosine and sine; polar functions and notation; and arithmetic of complex numbers.

Probability and Statistics provides a curriculum focused on understanding key data analysis and probabilistic concepts, calculations, and relevance to real-world applications. Students are challenged to work toward mastery of computational skills, apply calculators and other technology in data analysis, deepen their understanding of key ideas and solution strategies, and extend their knowledge through a variety of problem-solving applications.

Mathematics for College Readiness provides a fourth-year math curriculum focused on developing the mastery of skills identified as critical to postsecondary readiness in math. This full-year course is aligned with Florida's Postsecondary Readiness Competencies in mathematics and targets students who are required to complete additional instruction based on their performance on the Postsecondary Education Readiness Test (PERT).

Fundamental Math explores foundational concepts in math. Students master basic skills and extend their knowledge as they prepare for more advanced work. Topics include basic number concepts such as whole numbers, counting, place value, rounding, exponents, and negative numbers; addition and subtraction; and multiplication and division. The course also covers fractions, operations with fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, problem solving, basic concepts in geometry, and measuring shapes.

Accounting I examines how to make decisions about planning, organizing, and allocating resources using accounting procedures. Throughout the course, students focus on double-entry accounting; methods and principles of recording business transactions; the preparation of various documents used in recording revenues, expenses, assets, and liabilities; and the preparation of financial statements.

Accounting II builds on the foundation acquired in Accounting I, allowing students to extend their skills and knowledge in the subject. The course focuses on various managerial, financial, and operational accounting activities that require the formulation, interpretation, and communication of financial information for use in management decision making. Students will use equations, graphical representations, accounting tools, spreadsheet software, and accounting systems in real-world situations to maintain, monitor, control, and plan the use of financial resources.

World Languages

French I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as sports, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the verb system, adjective agreement, formal and informal address, reflexive verbs, and past tense. Students also gain an understanding of the cultures of French-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe, as well as insight into Francophone culture and people.

French II teaches students to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal address. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms in cooking, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes present- and past-tense verb forms and uses, negation, and direct and indirect objects. Students deepen their knowledge of French-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.

Spanish I teaches students to greet people, describe family and friends, talk about hobbies, and communicate about other topics, such as home life, occupations, travel, and medicine. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Vocabulary includes terms to describe school subjects, parts of the body, and people, as well as idiomatic phrases. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes the structures and uses of present-tense verb forms, imperatives, adjective agreement, impersonal constructions, formal and informal address, and reflexive verbs. Students explore words used in different Spanish-speaking regions and learn about the cultures of Spanish-speaking countries and regions within and outside Europe.

Building on Spanish I concepts, Spanish II students learn to communicate more confidently about themselves, as well as about topics beyond their own lives - both in formal and informal situations. Each lesson presents vocabulary, grammar, and culture in context, followed by explanations and exercises. Students expand their vocabulary in topics such as cooking, ecology, geography, and architecture. Instruction in language structure and grammar includes a review of present-tense verb forms, an introduction to the past tense, the conditional mood, imperatives, impersonal constructions, and reported speech. Students deepen their knowledge of Spanish-speaking regions and cultures by learning about history, literature, culture, and contemporary issues.

In Spanish III, students build upon the skills and knowledge they acquired in Spanish I and II.  The course presents new vocabulary and grammatical concepts in context while providing students with ample opportunities to review and expand upon the material they have learned previously.

* Prescriptive Course
^ Semester Course
h Honors Course
+ Additional Fee

Science

Biology focuses on the mastery of basic biological concepts and models while building scientific inquiry skills and exploring the connections between living things and their environment.

Middle School Grade 6 Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts such as the flow of energy and matter through both living and nonliving systems, including Earth's systems; Earth's weather and climate; the interaction between humans and the environment; the relationship between structure and function; and growth, development, and reproduction in organisms.

Middle School Grade 7 Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts such as the structures and properties of matter; chemical reactions; the flow of energy through systems, including Earth's living and nonliving systems; and the history of Earth.

Middle School Grade 8 Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts such as waves and electromagnetic radiation, energy and forces on Earth and in space, genetics and natural selection, and engineering design.

Science Foundations provides students with opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and strategies necessary for success in rigorous high school science courses. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as a bridge to high school.

Chemistry offers a curriculum that emphasizes students' understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology.

Chemistry in the Earth System integrates chemistry with biology and Earth science. Throughout the course, students apply fundamental chemistry concepts to better understand how matter and energy interact in the natural and designed world, how human activities impact Earth's systems, and how science can be used to develop new technologies and engineering solutions.

Earth Science offers a focused curriculum that explores Earth's composition, structure, processes, and history; its atmosphere, freshwater, and oceans; and its environment in space.

Environmental Science explores the biological, physical, and sociological principles related to the environment in which organisms live on Earth, the biosphere. Course topics include natural systems on Earth, biogeochemical cycles, the nature of matter and energy, the flow of matter and energy through living systems, populations, communities, ecosystems, ecological pyramids, renewable and non-renewable natural resources, land use, biodiversity, pollution, conservation, sustainability, and human impacts on the environment.

General Science provides students with opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, and strategies necessary for success in rigorous high school science courses. The course is appropriate for use as remediation at the high school level or as a bridge to high school.

Integrated Physics and Chemistry explores the nature of force, motion, energy, and matter. Course topics include kinematics, force, momentum, waves, atoms, the periodic table, molecular bonding, chemical reactivity, electricity, and nuclear energy.

Middle School Earth and Space Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts including Earth's systems, engineering design, the nature of the universe, and the interaction between humans and the environment.

Middle School Life Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts including the relationship between structure and function, the flow of energy and matter through living systems, heredity, and the diversity of life.

Middle School Life Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts including the relationship between structure and function, the flow of energy and matter through living systems, heredity, and the diversity of life.

Middle School Physical Science delivers instruction, practice, and review to help students develop scientific literacy, deepen conceptual understanding, and apply scientific practices. Students explore concepts including the interactions of matter; motion and stability; waves and their technological applications; and energy.

Physical Science offers a focused curriculum designed around the understanding of foundational physical science concepts, including the nature of matter, energy, and forces, as well as the application of scientific and engineering practices.

Physics offers a curriculum that emphasizes students' understanding of fundamental physics concepts while helping them acquire tools to be conversant in a society highly influenced by science and technology.

Physics of the Universe integrates physics with Earth and space science. Throughout the course, students apply fundamental physics concepts to better understand the impact of human activities on Earth's systems and how forces, energy, and matter interact throughout the universe.

The Living Earth integrates biology with Earth and space science. Throughout the course, students apply fundamental biological concepts to better understand how living systems and Earth's systems are interrelated and interdependent.

Visual and Performing Arts

Music Appreciation introduces students to the history, theory, and genres of music, from the most primitive surviving examples through the classical to the most contemporary in the world at large. The course is offered in a two-semester format. The first semester covers primitive musical forms and classical music. The second semester presents the rich modern traditions, including American jazz, gospel, folk, soul, blues, Latin rhythms, rock and roll, and hip-hop.

Art Appreciation is a survey of the history of Western visual arts, with a primary focus on painting. Students begin with an introduction to the basic principles of painting and learn how to critique and compare works of art. Students then explore prehistoric and early Greek and Roman art before they move on to the Middle Ages. Emphasis is placed on the Renaissance and the principles and masters that emerged in Italy and northern Europe. Students continue their art tour with the United States during the 20th century, a time of great innovation as abstract art took center stage. While Western art is the course's primary focus, students will finish the course by studying artistic traditions from Africa, Asia, Oceania, and the Americas.

3D Animation teaches students how to create their own animated 3D movie while also learning the fundamentals of animation. Using Blender® , ​a professional open-source 3D animation software, students use the same industry-standard techniques and workflows as animators in leading animation studios. By the end of the course, students will complete an incredible 3D Animation that they created from scratch.

In 3D Character Animation, students will animate their own Minecraft® story. Using professional animation software, they will learn concepts of storytelling, cinematography, and composition, along with key principles of animation, to create an exciting, unique story.

In 3D Game Design, students learn the basics of 3D video game design including models, textures, volumes, lighting, and more. Students will create their own amazing 3D world from start to finish.

In 3D Game Development, students learn the fundamentals of Coding in C# and game development skills by using Unity® , an industry-standard tool. Students will design their own custom video game just like the pros.

In 3D Printing & Modeling, students learn how to sculpt, texture, arrange, and render 3D models in preparation for 3D printing. They learn to use Blender®, a powerful open-source, professional 3D Design software used in a variety of disciplines, including design, animation, visual effects and engineering. In doing so, students learn the most important concepts for creating within a digital 3D environment, including navigating the XYZ Axes, the importance of low-poly designs, combining and modifying simple shapes to create complex designs, and more. 

This is a project-based course where students take on the role of creator. In addition to technical skills, students develop the creative, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills necessary to build amazing projects from start to finish. Throughout the course, students work with industry-standard tools used by professionals. If they need any help along the way with their coursework or projects, students can reach out to experts for support by e-mail, chat, or phone.

This course is designed to enable all students at the high school level to learn the basics of audio video production. The course will help the students develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities. The course is based on Career and Technical Education (CTE) standards designed to help students develop technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the audio video production industry.

This course is designed to enable students at high school level to develop the knowledge and skills related to audio video techniques that they can use in their careers. This course discusses the elements of audio video production, preproduction activities, media production techniques, and postproduction activities. The course is based on Career Technical Education (CTE) standards designed to help students develop technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the audio video production industry.

This course is designed to enable all students at the high school level to students understand the basic concepts in audio video manufacturing. Students will learn about preproduction techniques, advanced production techniques, advanced post-production techniques, mastering production techniques, special effects and animation, careers, and audio video production laws. The course is based on Career Technical Education (CTE) standards designed to help students prepare for entry into a wide range of careers in audio video production.

This is an effective and comprehensive introduction to careers in the rapidly expanding world of digital art. The course covers creative and practical aspects of digital art in 15 lessons that are enhanced with online discussions and a variety of activities. Beginning with a history of digital art, the course goes on to issues of design, color, and layout. While students will experience creation of digital art, they will also learn about converting traditional art to digital formats. 

From the history of drafting and design to a look at the latest in the industry's latest computer-aided tools, this course gives your students a comprehensive look at a dynamic and in-demand career. With 14 effective lessons and five engaging activities that lead to mastery of the course content, the course review and end of course assessment help ensure that mastery. The course features skill-embedded content that connects student learning to real-life experiences. 

This course will help students develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on topics such as history of graphic design, types of digital images, graphic design tools, storing and manipulating images, design elements and principles, copyright laws, and printing images. The course is based on Career Technical Education (CTE) standards designed to help students develop technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the graphic design industry.

Few recent technical innovations have changed an industry as fundamentally as digital photography has changed everything about the way we capture our lives in the way we take, edit, store, and share pictures. Digital Photography provides you with the flexibility to not only use it as an independent individual course or as a group or class course, but to also easily customize the course to the unique needs of your situation. The course combines 15 lessons with online discussions that promote the development of critical thinking skills as your students explore digital photography as an enriching activity or a career. 

Personalize learning for ALL.

Courses can be implemented in a variety of instructional models. For preview or demonstration, contact ADVANTAGES Digital Learning Solutions

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